College Math Teaching

October 4, 2016

Linear Transformation or not? The vector space operations matter.

Filed under: calculus, class room experiment, linear albegra, pedagogy — collegemathteaching @ 3:31 pm

This is nothing new; it is an example for undergraduates.

Consider the set R^+ = \{x| x > 0 \} endowed with the “vector addition” x \oplus y = xy where xy represents ordinary real number multiplication and “scalar multiplication r \odot x = x^r where r \in R and x^r is ordinary exponentiation. It is clear that \{R^+, R | \oplus, \odot \} is a vector space with 1 being the vector “additive” identity and 0 playing the role of the scalar zero and 1 playing the multiplicative identity. Verifying the various vector space axioms is a fun, if trivial exercise.

Now consider the function L(x) = ln(x) with domain R^+ . (here: ln(x) is the natural logarithm function). Now ln(xy) = ln(x) + ln(y) and ln(x^a) = aln(x) . This shows that L:R^+ \rightarrow R (the range has the usual vector space structure) is a linear transformation.

What is even better: ker(L) =\{x|ln(x) = 0 \} which shows that ker(L) = \{1 \} so L is one to one (of course, we know that from calculus).

And, given z \in R, ln(e^z) = z so L is also onto (we knew that from calculus or precalculus).

So, R^+ = \{x| x > 0 \} is isomorphic to R with the usual vector operations, and of course the inverse linear transformation is L^{-1}(y) = e^y .

Upshot: when one asks “is F a linear transformation or not”, one needs information about not only the domain set but also the vector space operations.

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